March 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

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Photo credit: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 147.

Photo caption: View of the empty corner lot of 5th Street and England Avenue, 1940, that would soon boast the E.W. Bickle Theatre. Charles Sillence photograph.

February 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Picking up the pieces after Courtenay’s devastating 1916 fire. King Studio photograph. CDM 972.54.5 Page 113.

Photo caption: “In [July] 1916, a devastating fire destroyed a city block, and the residents had only a bucket brigade with which to fight it. Joseph McPhee went to work once more to persuade his fellow citizens that the city should be in the water business.” Page 113.

January 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Island Realty Company, ca. 1911. Left to right: Unknown, Billy (William) Miller, P. Leo Anderton. CDM 991.164.1. Pages 72-73.

Photo caption: “In 1911, Peter Leo Anderton was one of the young businessmen who saw great potential in the new commercial district forming on the west side of the Courtenay River. Always known as P.Leo, he began as a notary public, working from his home, and then added insurance as well as real estate sales. He had his first big break acting for Joseph McPhee when McPhee sold the eleven-acre property known as “The Orchard” to investors Herman Helm and his son-in-law, Henry Herzog.

Customers recognized Anderton’s first office, on the south side of Union Street (Fifth Street) between the Courtenay Opera House and Marocchi’s Bakery, by the beautiful maple tree that grew out front.” Page 73.

December 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Comox Co-operative Creamery building, 1927. CDM 986.73.3. Pages 84-85.

Photo caption: “…the Creamery became a one-stop shop for dairy products, grains and farm supplies for Courtenay and the valley, and its milk, butter, cheese and ice cream were sold throughout British Columbia. By 1920, 2,700 cows were contributing to the co-op.” Page 86.

November 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: A tranquil view of the Courtenay River, ca. 1900. CDM 972.235.9. Pages 22-23.

Photo caption: “The Courtenay River, one of the shortest navigable rivers in Canada, runs through today’s downtown Courtenay. The Puntledge, Browns and Tsolum Rivers empty into it. Settlers’ homes and farms stretched along the shorelines and on to the rivers’ upper and lower prairies.” Page 23.

October 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Comox Landing, ca. 1910, with the HMS Egeria and the HMS Algerine visible in the harbour. Walter Gage photograph. Photo: CDM 979.3.3. Pages 48-49.

Photo caption: “Before, and after, construction of the Comox Wharf in 1874, Comox was the main transportation link to points north and south. Comox Landing, with its gentle slope sheltered by Goose Spit and expansive view of the Beaufort Range and Baynes Sound, made it a perfect gathering place.” Page 53.

September 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Threshing on the Duncan farm at Sandwick, ca. 1895. Photo: CDM Stubbs Collection. Page 57.

Photo caption: “…Farmers settling on both the lower and upper prairies were eager to bring their produce and manufactured goods to market. The most efficient way to handle Courtenay’s freight was to barge milled lumber, agricultural products, grains and household goods to and from the head of navigation on the Courtenay River, immediately downstream from the Courtenay River Bridge…” Page 56.

August 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image


Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: Cousins Edith Bates (in back), Reg Biscoe, George Bates and Marjorie Biscoe with Bingo at Seal Bay, ca. 1926. The Bates family had a beach cottage at Seal Bay, not too far from the Biscoes’ summer home at Kye Bay. Like other Comox Valley children they enjoyed an idyllic existence in the outdoors, with unspoiled beaches close by. Photo: CDM 988.197.133.

Photo caption: “Seal Bay Park, a treasure of biodiversity, harbours tall and stately giants of the coastal forest, lush undergrowth and a number of rare specimens. It offers the public the deep tranquility of a protected forest. Those who take time to linger may also find clues to the forest’s past.” Page 144.

July 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image


Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: July 1st parade at the corner of 5th Street and Cliffe Avenue, 1948. George Apps photograph. Photo: CDM 997.505.15. Page 184.

Photo caption: “For a generation that had lived through the aftermath of the Great War, the Great Depression and World War II, the war’s end signalled an era of promise like none before. The high number of weddings in Courtenay at this time indicated that people had a cautious optimism about their lives ahead.” Page 185.

June 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Mrs. Margaret Frank and Chief Andy Frank in the 1967 Courtenay parade. Ruth Masters photograph. Photo: CDM 2007.251.18. Page 188.

Photo caption: “In 1906, Mary and Billie Frank, Andy’s mother and father, decided to canoe to Tree Island (now Sandy Island Marine Park) to harvest clams. They pitched their tents on the island, and Andy was born there, the youngest of the family…In the 1920s, Andy went into an Alert Bay store for fishing supplies. He was so smitten by one of the clerks that he needed to make several trips into the store to choose the right flashlight. The clerk, Margaret Wilson from T’sakis (Fort Rupert), of high status and with strong convictions about promoting awareness of indigenous heritage, married Andy first by tradition and later in a church.” Page 119.