September 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Division 2 class from the Fanny Bay School, 1939. Teacher Irene Jones is standing on the far right of the photograph with the boys. CDM 984.39.1 Page 179.

Photo caption: “From 1926 until 1942, about half the students at the two-room Fanny Bay School were of Japanese descent. Their fathers worked for the Kagetsu Logging Company, which had a sizeable operation in the area. It was important to the families to preserve their culture, and the children would often entertain their classmates with costumed performances of song and dance. They brought lunches of raw clams, rice balls and seaweed to eat alongside their friends.” Page 178.

August 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: These sheds in Lewis Park, 1930s, were used during agricultural fairs. Charles Sillence photograph. Photo: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 157.

Photo: “People anticipated plays, musicals and fairs for months in advance and attended from all around the district. Fun was, and still is, a big word in the valley’s vocabulary.” Page 121.

July 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: An impressive array of canned goods on display in the Safeway Store, 1932. Charles Sillence photograph.

Photo: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 153.

June 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Navy personnel at Goose Spit, 1940s. George Hobson is second from left in the front row. CDM 999.140.1 Page 187.

Photo caption: “…an article from the Comox Argus of April 20, 1944, titled “Camp Followers in Courtenay,” described a report by Sergeant Hatcher of the Provincial Police to Courtenay city council about camp followers, wild women and sharks – civilians who travelled around to exploit military personnel – who were showing up in town.” Page 176.

March 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

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Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 147.

Photo caption: View of the empty corner lot of 5th Street and England Avenue, 1940, that would soon boast the E.W. Bickle Theatre. Charles Sillence photograph.

February 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Picking up the pieces after Courtenay’s devastating 1916 fire. King Studio photograph. CDM 972.54.5 Page 113.

Photo caption: “In [July] 1916, a devastating fire destroyed a city block, and the residents had only a bucket brigade with which to fight it. Joseph McPhee went to work once more to persuade his fellow citizens that the city should be in the water business.” Page 113.

January 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Island Realty Company, ca. 1911. Left to right: Unknown, Billy (William) Miller, P. Leo Anderton. CDM 991.164.1. Pages 72-73.

Photo caption: “In 1911, Peter Leo Anderton was one of the young businessmen who saw great potential in the new commercial district forming on the west side of the Courtenay River. Always known as P.Leo, he began as a notary public, working from his home, and then added insurance as well as real estate sales. He had his first big break acting for Joseph McPhee when McPhee sold the eleven-acre property known as “The Orchard” to investors Herman Helm and his son-in-law, Henry Herzog.

Customers recognized Anderton’s first office, on the south side of Union Street (Fifth Street) between the Courtenay Opera House and Marocchi’s Bakery, by the beautiful maple tree that grew out front.” Page 73.

December 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Comox Co-operative Creamery building, 1927. CDM 986.73.3. Pages 84-85.

Photo caption: “…the Creamery became a one-stop shop for dairy products, grains and farm supplies for Courtenay and the valley, and its milk, butter, cheese and ice cream were sold throughout British Columbia. By 1920, 2,700 cows were contributing to the co-op.” Page 86.