March 2020 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: A dramatic family portrait by Walter Gage, ca. 1905. Photo: 990.24.13. Page vi.

The family in this portrait have been identified by their descendants and the date revised since publication of Watershed Moments. They are the McKelvey family of Dove Creek. The patriarch, Stafford, died December 28, 1901 at the age of 42 from “acute general peritonitis.”

Left to right: William, Nancy, Stafford, Mary Hannah and Frederick Allan. Missing from the photo is the eldest son Adam Samuel McKelvey. Sorry – no names known for deer or dog.

February 2020 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: View from Comox Hill, 1890s. Photo: CDM Stubbs Collection. Page 39-40.

Photo caption: “Though the land and water provided more than enough for food and shelter, the K’ómoks people had a long tradition of trade with other coastal groups. They also traded cedar root and eulachon oil for Saskatoon berries and dried grass and root fibres from the interior Salish people. This exchange continued with the settlers, who traded tobacco, guns, ammunition, blankets, fabric, buttons, beads, sugar and flour for furs.” Page 30.

January 2020 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Bill Ardley’s Garage, 1932, was located on Anderton Avenue near Central Builders Supply Ltd. and backed onto the Courtenay River. Charles Sillence photograph. Photo: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 152.

Photo caption: “British Columbians adjusted to driving on the right-hand side of the road when it became the law on January 1, 1922. And due to the economic boom in the mid- to late 1920s automobile sales increased, which meant there were more drivers on the road. Businesses developed to service four-wheeled travellers and holiday makers.” Page 151.

November 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image

Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: Local members of the British Columbia Women’s Service Corps display plums picked for the “Jam for Britain” campaign, ca. 1941. Left to right: Pam Harvey, Mrs. Lucy Muir, Mrs. Clive, Mary Bell. Lynn Henderson photograph. Photo: 982.24.76. Page 182.

Photo caption: “In 1941, the Red Cross, the Women’s Institute (WI) and the Comox Valley Co-operative Producers joined forces with the people of the valley to send jam to Britain. They borrowed a jam kettle from the Creamery and asked the public to take surplus fruit and sugar to the old cannery, where Mrs. McPhee, Mrs. Harmston and the ladies of the WI made plum and blackberry jam. Children raised money to purchase sugar and went on blackberry-picking expeditions by the busload. The Courtenay Rotary Club arranged the buses and helped with packing. That year, they shipped three tons of jam. In the following two years, when the harvest was leaner, two tons.” Page 182.

September 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Division 2 class from the Fanny Bay School, 1939. Teacher Irene Jones is standing on the far right of the photograph with the boys. CDM 984.39.1 Page 179.

Photo caption: “From 1926 until 1942, about half the students at the two-room Fanny Bay School were of Japanese descent. Their fathers worked for the Kagetsu Logging Company, which had a sizeable operation in the area. It was important to the families to preserve their culture, and the children would often entertain their classmates with costumed performances of song and dance. They brought lunches of raw clams, rice balls and seaweed to eat alongside their friends.” Page 178.

August 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: These sheds in Lewis Park, 1930s, were used during agricultural fairs. Charles Sillence photograph. Photo: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 157.

Photo: “People anticipated plays, musicals and fairs for months in advance and attended from all around the district. Fun was, and still is, a big word in the valley’s vocabulary.” Page 121.

July 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: An impressive array of canned goods on display in the Safeway Store, 1932. Charles Sillence photograph.

Photo: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 153.

June 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Navy personnel at Goose Spit, 1940s. George Hobson is second from left in the front row. CDM 999.140.1 Page 187.

Photo caption: “…an article from the Comox Argus of April 20, 1944, titled “Camp Followers in Courtenay,” described a report by Sergeant Hatcher of the Provincial Police to Courtenay city council about camp followers, wild women and sharks – civilians who travelled around to exploit military personnel – who were showing up in town.” Page 176.