June 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Navy personnel at Goose Spit, 1940s. George Hobson is second from left in the front row. CDM 999.140.1 Page 187.

Photo caption: “…an article from the Comox Argus of April 20, 1944, titled “Camp Followers in Courtenay,” described a report by Sergeant Hatcher of the Provincial Police to Courtenay city council about camp followers, wild women and sharks – civilians who travelled around to exploit military personnel – who were showing up in town.” Page 176.

March 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

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Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 147.

Photo caption: View of the empty corner lot of 5th Street and England Avenue, 1940, that would soon boast the E.W. Bickle Theatre. Charles Sillence photograph.

February 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Picking up the pieces after Courtenay’s devastating 1916 fire. King Studio photograph. CDM 972.54.5 Page 113.

Photo caption: “In [July] 1916, a devastating fire destroyed a city block, and the residents had only a bucket brigade with which to fight it. Joseph McPhee went to work once more to persuade his fellow citizens that the city should be in the water business.” Page 113.

January 2019 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Island Realty Company, ca. 1911. Left to right: Unknown, Billy (William) Miller, P. Leo Anderton. CDM 991.164.1. Pages 72-73.

Photo caption: “In 1911, Peter Leo Anderton was one of the young businessmen who saw great potential in the new commercial district forming on the west side of the Courtenay River. Always known as P.Leo, he began as a notary public, working from his home, and then added insurance as well as real estate sales. He had his first big break acting for Joseph McPhee when McPhee sold the eleven-acre property known as “The Orchard” to investors Herman Helm and his son-in-law, Henry Herzog.

Customers recognized Anderton’s first office, on the south side of Union Street (Fifth Street) between the Courtenay Opera House and Marocchi’s Bakery, by the beautiful maple tree that grew out front.” Page 73.

December 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Comox Co-operative Creamery building, 1927. CDM 986.73.3. Pages 84-85.

Photo caption: “…the Creamery became a one-stop shop for dairy products, grains and farm supplies for Courtenay and the valley, and its milk, butter, cheese and ice cream were sold throughout British Columbia. By 1920, 2,700 cows were contributing to the co-op.” Page 86.

November 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: A tranquil view of the Courtenay River, ca. 1900. CDM 972.235.9. Pages 22-23.

Photo caption: “The Courtenay River, one of the shortest navigable rivers in Canada, runs through today’s downtown Courtenay. The Puntledge, Browns and Tsolum Rivers empty into it. Settlers’ homes and farms stretched along the shorelines and on to the rivers’ upper and lower prairies.” Page 23.

October 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Comox Landing, ca. 1910, with the HMS Egeria and the HMS Algerine visible in the harbour. Walter Gage photograph. Photo: CDM 979.3.3. Pages 48-49.

Photo caption: “Before, and after, construction of the Comox Wharf in 1874, Comox was the main transportation link to points north and south. Comox Landing, with its gentle slope sheltered by Goose Spit and expansive view of the Beaufort Range and Baynes Sound, made it a perfect gathering place.” Page 53.

September 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Threshing on the Duncan farm at Sandwick, ca. 1895. Photo: CDM Stubbs Collection. Page 57.

Photo caption: “…Farmers settling on both the lower and upper prairies were eager to bring their produce and manufactured goods to market. The most efficient way to handle Courtenay’s freight was to barge milled lumber, agricultural products, grains and household goods to and from the head of navigation on the Courtenay River, immediately downstream from the Courtenay River Bridge…” Page 56.