Lecture: Against the Current, The Remarkable Life of Agnes Deans Cameron

Cathy Converse presents “Against the Current: The Remarkable Life of Agnes Deans Cameron,” an illustrated lecture based on her newly released book, at 7pm on Thursday, June 14 in the Courtenay and District Museum.

Agnes Deans Cameron was an extraordinary woman who set the educational establishment on edge. Born in Victoria to Scottish immigrants in 1863, she was ahead by a century and achieved a number of “firsts” in her life. She was one of the most well-known educators, writers, and lecturers in Canada and put western Canada on the map through her writing, cycling, and encouragement of Western immigration.

Click for More Info

May 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image


Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: Bedroom suite in the Courtenay Hotel, 1941. Charles Sillence photograph. Photo: CDM Sillence Collection. Page 137.

Photo caption: “Before World War I, [William] Lewis added a third storey, and there was no shortage of visitors when the E & N Railway arrived in Courtenay in 1914…Major renovations and additions in 1916 and 1938 left the building with a stucco finish and increased protection against flooding.” Page 68.

Periodical Wisdom

Women’s magazines and periodicals from the past offer some great advice on things like how to economize, care for your baby’s teeth or even the proper way to make social introductions.

We’ve scoured the archives for some examples to share with you. As always, please remember to take the information with “a grain of salt” and use your common sense before implementing.

This month’s write-up is an article is from The Ladies’ Review of May 1908 and offers “Some Homely Cleansing Agents.”

Click for Larger Image

Click for Larger Image

April 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image

Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: Courtenay’s original city centre, ca. 1905. Walter Gage photograph. Photo: CDM 972.270.2. Page 62-63.

Photo caption: “”Lewistown,” as some called it, was just across from the head of the slough, at the junction of Dyke Road and Upper Prairie Road. It became a thriving commercial centre…Opposite the hotel was McKean & Biscoe’s dry goods and grocery store. The Masonic Lodge met on the upper floor of this building for thirty-three years. Courtenay’s first bank, the Royal Bank of Canada, opened here in 1909.” Page 63.

March 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image

Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: Girl Guides depart from Royston train station, 1928. Left to right: Gladys Idiens, Joyce Edwards, Margaret Dunn, Dot Waterfield, Mrs. Mary Greig, Ritsuko Uchiyama, Lynn Hilton. Photo: CDM 990.16.26. Page 158-159.

Photo caption: “The first E & N passenger train arrived in Courtenay on August 6, 1914. The August 13 Courtenay Review noted that the train “consisted of baggage and express cars and four coaches.” The trip from Victoria covered 139.7 miles, with the train averaging a speed of roughly twenty miles an hour.

This arrival of the E & N, combined with major expansion of industrial rail lines, strengthened camps and communities such as Union Bay, Royston, Miracle Beach, Cumberland and Headquarters over the next fifty years.” Page 128.

Life on the Spit: the Photographs of Elizabeth Quocksister

Museum at Campbell River until March 4, 2018

This exhibit showcases what life was like for the families living on the Campbell River Spit Reserve during the period from the early 1940s up until the late 1960s. The photographs were taken by local woman Elizabeth Quocksister and feature many people whose descendants are still living on the Reserve today.

Psst! While technically open until March 4, it would be best to visit before February 19 because after that date the space will be shared with book sale tables.

Click here for Visitor Information