December 2017 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

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Photo credit: The biggest and best dance floor in British Columbia: the Royston Imperial Pavilion, 1931. Charles Sillence photograph. Page 146-147.

Photo caption: “From 1923 to 1940, the steady stream of traffic winding its way south from Courtenay on a Saturday night was heading for the Royston Imperial Pavilion, the largest, and reputedly the best, dance floor in British Columbia‚ĶIn July 1940, as the band was setting up, a short in the wiring caused a fire that swept through the building, engulfing it completely in ten minutes. Paper decorations and greenery fuelled the blaze.” Page 145.

Seasonal Recipes from 1956

We searched the archives cook book collection to provide you with a few recipes for the holidays.

A complete column of cookie dough possibilities from the St. Joseph’s Hospital WA Cook Book compiled in 1956 provides four choices including the ever popular(?) Krinkly Uncles!

It’s All There in Black and White: Gas Masks for Civilians

Some of the text in this article from the Comox District Free Press of November 19, 1942 might be a bit difficult to make out. To clarify the issue, here’s what the Comox Argus had to say: “The ARP has received two tons of gas respirators for the use of the civilian population. The two tons represent 2790 masks. These masks will be sold to the public for $1.25 each and ARP instructors will be available to show the applicants how to wear them.”

Dig into the Free Press scan for a more detailed account.

Just for Fun November 2017

You won’t want to miss this little gem from November 1962 called “How to Use a Dial Telephone in Courtenay.”

The flyer was part of a donation to the museum from a family home in Merville that was built in 1938 and housed several generations of folks whose surnames will be familiar to many: Adamschek, Richter and Keller.

November 2017 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Seeing the boys off. Valley residents turn up en masse to say farewell to the 102nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, 1916. Walter Gage photograph. CDM 972.55.20. Page 130-131.

Photo caption: “The Battalion participated in a number of prominent campaigns in France and Flanders in the following years: the Somme and Ancre Heights in 1916; Arras, Ypres, Vimy Ridge, Hill 70 and Passchendaele in 1917. It played a major role in deciding the battles at Amiens, Scarpe, Drocourt-Queant, Canal de Nord, “The Hindenburg Line” and Valenciennes. More than a quarter of its members died. The unit disbanded on September 15, 1920.” Page 132.

Genealogy Seminar

The Campbell River Genealogy Society is hosting a seminar with Dave Obee on Saturday, November 18th titled “What’s in Your Toolbox?”

To find out more about topics, fees and availability click here.

Deadline to register is November 10, 2017.

It’s All There in Black and White: Canada’s First Female Governor General

Pop quiz. What trailblazing woman became Canada’s first female governor general? Two hints: 1) she served from 1984 to 1990, 2) she visited the Comox Valley 30 years ago this month. Not sure? Check out the coverage of her visit that appeared in the October 14th edition of the Comox District Free Press.

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With legacy support from the Bickle Family and the Comox Valley Echo.

October 2017 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Comox District Women’s Institute making Red Cross Jam, 1941. Third from left is Mrs. Margaret McPhee, fourth from left is G.W. (Bill) Stubbs and third from right is Theed Pearse. Charles Sillence photograph. CDM Stubbs Collection. Page 183.

Photo caption: “In 1941, the Red Cross, the Women’s Institute (WI) and the Comox Valley Co-operative Producers joined forces with the people of the valley to send jam to Britain. They borrowed a jam kettle from the Creamery and asked the public to take surplus fruit and sugar to the old cannery, where Mrs. McPhee, Mrs. Harmston and the ladies of the WI made plum and blackberry jam. Children raised money to purchase sugar and went on blackberry-picking expeditions by the busload. The Courtenay Rotary Club arranged the buses and helped with packing. That year, they shipped three tons of jam. In the following two years, when the harvest was leaner, two tons.” Page 182.

September 2017 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image

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Photo credit: Courtenay Elementary School class brandishing sports equipment, ca.1906. Walter Gage photograph. CDM 983.55.1

Photo caption: Photo caption: “T.J. Barron, a graduate of McGill University, taught at the Courtenay school from 1905 to 1915. Previous teachers had mostly been young, with little experience, but Mr. Barron was a seasoned and accomplished educator who had high expectations for decorum, academic results and physical activity. Club swinging and wand drills were popular forms of athletic training in the early 1900s.” Page 115.