August 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

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Photo credit: Cousins Edith Bates (in back), Reg Biscoe, George Bates and Marjorie Biscoe with Bingo at Seal Bay, ca. 1926. The Bates family had a beach cottage at Seal Bay, not too far from the Biscoes’ summer home at Kye Bay. Like other Comox Valley children they enjoyed an idyllic existence in the outdoors, with unspoiled beaches close by. Photo: CDM 988.197.133.

Photo caption: “Seal Bay Park, a treasure of biodiversity, harbours tall and stately giants of the coastal forest, lush undergrowth and a number of rare specimens. It offers the public the deep tranquility of a protected forest. Those who take time to linger may also find clues to the forest’s past.” Page 144.

Periodical Wisdom: August 2018

We’ve scoured the archives for women’s magazines and periodicals to share some advice from the good old days.

Sage advice courtesy of the August 1932 McCall’s magazine on how to get the most out of bathing. That includes the recommendation of adding three special baths to your regime each week: a fatigue bath, a wake-up bath and a luxury bath.

It’s All There in Black and White: Native Son’s Hall 80th Birthday

She’s reached another milestone…80 years since the inaugural dance was held in the Native Sons Hall. What a night that must have been!

Movers, shakers and contractors from near and far are all listed in this article from the Courtenay Free Press of August 15, 1928.

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With legacy support from the Bickle Family and the Comox Valley Echo.

It’s All There in Black and White: Florence Filberg Centre Opening

It has been 30 years since the Florence Filberg Centre opened. Click on the images below to learn more about the background financials and dignitaries of the day in this July 13, 1988 article from the Comox District Free Press.

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With legacy support from the Bickle Family and the Comox Valley Echo.

July 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image


Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: July 1st parade at the corner of 5th Street and Cliffe Avenue, 1948. George Apps photograph. Photo: CDM 997.505.15. Page 184.

Photo caption: “For a generation that had lived through the aftermath of the Great War, the Great Depression and World War II, the war’s end signalled an era of promise like none before. The high number of weddings in Courtenay at this time indicated that people had a cautious optimism about their lives ahead.” Page 185.

June 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Mrs. Margaret Frank and Chief Andy Frank in the 1967 Courtenay parade. Ruth Masters photograph. Photo: CDM 2007.251.18. Page 188.

Photo caption: “In 1906, Mary and Billie Frank, Andy’s mother and father, decided to canoe to Tree Island (now Sandy Island Marine Park) to harvest clams. They pitched their tents on the island, and Andy was born there, the youngest of the family…In the 1920s, Andy went into an Alert Bay store for fishing supplies. He was so smitten by one of the clerks that he needed to make several trips into the store to choose the right flashlight. The clerk, Margaret Wilson from T’sakis (Fort Rupert), of high status and with strong convictions about promoting awareness of indigenous heritage, married Andy first by tradition and later in a church.” Page 119.

Welcome Back Vaux’s Swifts!

Swifts on Oak-Beeville Texas 2013. Photo by: Jason Collins

The Vaux’s Swifts have returned to the Courtenay Muesum’s brick chimney! As of Sunday evening, April 29, local birder and naturalist, Krista Kaptein, spotted two hundred and seventy birds entering the chimney and they’ve visited successive nights with arrival times between 7:30 and 8:30 and in varying numbers.

Last year, the swifts made an unexpected visit in mid-May. Here’s CHEK’s May 13, 2017 take the on the event with help from Fox and Bee Studios . The swift’s arrival became a must-see for island birders and some came from as far away as Victoria.

For the swift’s 2017 arrival, local birders let us know how special this visit was and connected staff to Larry Schwitters, a Washington resident and scientist who leads the Audubon supported Vaux’s Happening site which tracks numbers of the “wee birds” and roost sites and has a live cam inside Monroe, Washington’s Wagner Center chimney. Monroe residents even celebrate the swifts’ large migratory event, more than 20,000 birds, with “Swift Night Out”. Here’s a closer look at swifts getting ready to leave the Monroe chimney this spring 2018.

The City of Courtenay also helped last year with a soot clean-up and with taking measures to keep swifts safe in the chimney.

We hope you have a chance to come down to see the swifts in the evening and to welcome them back.