January 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Riverside Hotel made an impressive sight at the corner of 5th Street and Cliffe Avenue, 1944. Charles Sillence photograph. Page 180-181.

Photo caption: “When the Riverside was lost to fire in 1968 [January 2], people perhaps missed it most for the curved wall that marked the corner and provided a seat for those with time to spare. Here, they would comment on the passersby, venture an opinion on matters of local and national import, and pontificate for all who would listen.” Page 70.

Thank You Ruth Masters

Thank you Ruth. For your humour, for your energy in preserving cultural and natural history, for getting up, it appeared to be, every day of your life, and doing something that made a difference while constantly acknowledging each person, creature, and natural feature around you. Thank you for your legacy contributions that live on.

Ruth Masters served on the Courtenay and District Museum Board for over forty years. Her support and creativity were endless. Thank you Ruth Masters.

Please read Past President, Judy Hagen’s, tribute to Ruth

December 2017 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: The biggest and best dance floor in British Columbia: the Royston Imperial Pavilion, 1931. Charles Sillence photograph. Page 146-147.

Photo caption: “From 1923 to 1940, the steady stream of traffic winding its way south from Courtenay on a Saturday night was heading for the Royston Imperial Pavilion, the largest, and reputedly the best, dance floor in British Columbia…In July 1940, as the band was setting up, a short in the wiring caused a fire that swept through the building, engulfing it completely in ten minutes. Paper decorations and greenery fuelled the blaze.” Page 145.

Seasonal Recipes from 1956

We searched the archives cook book collection to provide you with a few recipes for the holidays.

A complete column of cookie dough possibilities from the St. Joseph’s Hospital WA Cook Book compiled in 1956 provides four choices including the ever popular(?) Krinkly Uncles!

It’s All There in Black and White: Gas Masks for Civilians

Some of the text in this article from the Comox District Free Press of November 19, 1942 might be a bit difficult to make out. To clarify the issue, here’s what the Comox Argus had to say: “The ARP has received two tons of gas respirators for the use of the civilian population. The two tons represent 2790 masks. These masks will be sold to the public for $1.25 each and ARP instructors will be available to show the applicants how to wear them.”

Dig into the Free Press scan for a more detailed account.

Just for Fun November 2017

You won’t want to miss this little gem from November 1962 called “How to Use a Dial Telephone in Courtenay.”

The flyer was part of a donation to the museum from a family home in Merville that was built in 1938 and housed several generations of folks whose surnames will be familiar to many: Adamschek, Richter and Keller.

November 2017 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Seeing the boys off. Valley residents turn up en masse to say farewell to the 102nd Canadian Infantry Battalion, 1916. Walter Gage photograph. CDM 972.55.20. Page 130-131.

Photo caption: “The Battalion participated in a number of prominent campaigns in France and Flanders in the following years: the Somme and Ancre Heights in 1916; Arras, Ypres, Vimy Ridge, Hill 70 and Passchendaele in 1917. It played a major role in deciding the battles at Amiens, Scarpe, Drocourt-Queant, Canal de Nord, “The Hindenburg Line” and Valenciennes. More than a quarter of its members died. The unit disbanded on September 15, 1920.” Page 132.