March 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

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Click for Larger Image

Photo credit: Girl Guides depart from Royston train station, 1928. Left to right: Gladys Idiens, Joyce Edwards, Margaret Dunn, Dot Waterfield, Mrs. Mary Greig, Ritsuko Uchiyama, Lynn Hilton. Photo: CDM 990.16.26. Page 158-159.

Photo caption: “The first E & N passenger train arrived in Courtenay on August 6, 1914. The August 13 Courtenay Review noted that the train “consisted of baggage and express cars and four coaches.” The trip from Victoria covered 139.7 miles, with the train averaging a speed of roughly twenty miles an hour.

This arrival of the E & N, combined with major expansion of industrial rail lines, strengthened camps and communities such as Union Bay, Royston, Miracle Beach, Cumberland and Headquarters over the next fifty years.” Page 128.

February 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Florence Harmston and Sam Cliffe both sailed to Vancouver Island on the Silistria in 1862 and married a decade later in 1872. Photo: CDM 974.78.1 Page 14.

Photo caption: “Ten years after his 1862 voyage, in April 1872, Sam Cliffe married Florence Harmston, who had made the same voyage on the Silistria at the age of six with her parents, William and Mary Harmston. According to family stories, the Harmstons had intended to continue their voyage on the Silistria to arrive in April in Port Clemens, New Zealand. They changed course when they noticed an ad for prairie land in the Comox Valley. Florence, born on the Isle of Man, had fifteen children with Sam. Ten survived to adulthood. Florence and Sam took over the Lorne Hotel in 1883. Sam died in 1908, and Florence twenty-one years later, in 1929.” Page 14.

January 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: The Riverside Hotel made an impressive sight at the corner of 5th Street and Cliffe Avenue, 1944. Charles Sillence photograph. Page 180-181.

Photo caption: “When the Riverside was lost to fire in 1968 [January 2], people perhaps missed it most for the curved wall that marked the corner and provided a seat for those with time to spare. Here, they would comment on the passersby, venture an opinion on matters of local and national import, and pontificate for all who would listen.” Page 70.

Thank You Ruth Masters

Thank you Ruth. For your humour, for your energy in preserving cultural and natural history, for getting up, it appeared to be, every day of your life, and doing something that made a difference while constantly acknowledging each person, creature, and natural feature around you. Thank you for your legacy contributions that live on.

Ruth Masters served on the Courtenay and District Museum Board for over forty years. Her support and creativity were endless. Thank you Ruth Masters.

Please read Past President, Judy Hagen’s, tribute to Ruth