The Museum’s Blog

Periodical Wisdom: September 2018

We’ve scoured the archives for women’s magazines and periodicals to share some advice from the good old days.

So now that you’ve completed your back to school shopping you might want to arrange a children’s tea party. This write-up from The Lady of December 8, 1938 gives some wonderful foodie tips for a Downton Abbey style bash perfect for the little ones.

Click for Larger Image

Click for Larger Image

Lecture: Mudflat Dreaming

Time and Date: 7 pm, Thursday, October 11, 2018

Location: Rotary Gallery of the Courtenay and District Museum

Speaker: Jean Walton

Tickets: $5 for Historical Society members; $6 for general public (plus GST). Advance tickets recommended. Tickets can be purchased over the phone by calling 250-334-0686 ext 5.

Jean Walton’s newly released Mudflat Dreaming tells the story of two communities on Vancouver’s waterfront fringes in the 1970s – Bridgeview and Maplewood.

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Roman Catholic Church of the Canadian Martyrs Dedication

The original dedication gathering of the Roman Catholic Church of the Canadian Martyrs in Courtenay, BC on September 25, 1938.

Seen in the crowd on the right hand side of the photo are Courtenay Mayor M.S. Stephens and Aldermen Theed Pearse and Perry Hanson.

Photo from Stubbs Collection, Courtenay and District Museum.

It’s All There in Black and White: Old Church Theatre 80th Birthday

September marks the 80th birthday of the building known today as the Old Church Theatre on Harmston Avenue in Courtenay.

It was originally the Roman Catholic Church of the Canadian Martyrs and its official dedication made front page news in the Comox District Free Press of September 29, 1938.

Bonus!
Click here for a photograph of the original dedication gathering September 25, 1938.

With legacy support from the Bickle Family and the Comox Valley Echo.

September 2018 Watershed Moments

Here is the latest newsletter installment of an image and quote from the museum’s award-winning book Watershed Moments – A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District.

Photo credit: Threshing on the Duncan farm at Sandwick, ca. 1895. Photo: CDM Stubbs Collection. Page 57.

Photo caption: “…Farmers settling on both the lower and upper prairies were eager to bring their produce and manufactured goods to market. The most efficient way to handle Courtenay’s freight was to barge milled lumber, agricultural products, grains and household goods to and from the head of navigation on the Courtenay River, immediately downstream from the Courtenay River Bridge…” Page 56.

Book Launch: Dancing in Gumboots

Time and Date: 1-4 pm, Saturday, September 29, 2018

Location: Rotary Gallery of the Courtenay and District Museum

Free event; suitable for all ages.

Join us to celebrate the launch of Dancing in Gumboots: the sequel anthology to the extraordinarily successful Gumboot Girls.

Fascinated by the stories of women who travelled to the Comox Valley in the 1970s, Lou Allison and Jane Wilde return to their dynamic partnership to bring us an anthology that shines a light on these trailblazing women and their unique stories.

Expect a drop-in, casual event with refreshments, music and a chance to mingle with many of the contributing authors. This launch is co-sponsored by Laughing Oyster Bookshop and the Courtenay and District Museum.

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Potlatch 67-67: The Potlatch Ban – Then and Now

On now at Comox Valley Art Gallery

Potlatch 67-67: The Potlatch Ban – Then and Now examines the impact of the attempted cultural genocide through the potlatch ban and the resilience of Indigenous people in maintaining and reclaiming traditional cultural practices and in creating new forms of cultural expression. 2018 marks the 67th year since the Canadian government’s Potlatch Ban was lifted, after it was imposed on Indigenous people for 67 years.

Nagezdi, Rob Everson Hereditary Chief of the Gigalgam Walas KwaguĊ‚, recognized that many Canadians do not understand the history of Indigenous peoples. He envisioned an Indigenous art exhibition and cultural program that would powerfully engage the local community and fellow Canadians, both Indigenous and settler, about this shared history and the impact. With organizers, community partners, artists, and a clear vision, the creators of Potlatch 67-67 present this convergent thematic program.

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